Doing the math

Nancy commented that she’d like some perspective on the current phase of My Heart’s Compass. This is one side of the bed cloth and I’ve added stars to not quite half a yard of four strips.

2 sides of the bed cloth x 90 inches of length x 11 strips of cloth to be stitched down = 1980 inches or 55 yards of star-spangled stitching.

And the search for random continues with this latest gambit …

Which ends up looking like this on the other side …

For those who might be wondering, I’m using #8 and #12 DMC perle cotton … not that there are many who are apt to want to do this!

And last, the wider view (about half the cloth is visible) …

Steady progress

I thought I’d show you the other side of the sea for a change …

Which is to say, 1.5’ done (on the left) and 3.5’ to go (on the right). I’ve already used up two full skeins of Deb’s thread so I’m happier than usual that I have a substantial stash on hand.

And in a wonderful bit of serendipity, Amanda made a comment yesterday that coincided with two screen shots I took on Sunday …

I love synchronicity!

Meanwhile, I’ve been trying to get back into walking around the neighborhood. The ajuga is blooming and the butterflies are on the wing …

I’m hoping the neighborhood trees that were damaged by the ice storm can recover …

Fortunately things aren’t all bad …

And I’m thankful for neighbors who give me good reasons to smile …

Brrrrrr

Weather news first … it’s not really that cold at 30 degrees in Central Texas, but a fine rain continues to fall, weighing the trees down with ice. Behind our house, the neighbor’s live oak has drooped another 2-3 feet since I took the first picture at dawn …

We did lose power for a couple of hours, but we are fortunate (?) to have a gas stove, so I was able to make hot coffee and grain cereal for breakfast.

Our daughter in south Austin has not (yet?) lost power, but she does have a lot of live oaks which are losing branches at an alarming rate …

And so it goes …

On a more positive note, I have encased the raw edges of three Glennis moons in close(d) herringbone, seen here front and back …

Note that all the moon patches were first basted down with Jude’s glue stitch, which will remain in place as the tiny white stitches serve as visible “stars” on the front of the patches.

As you can see, there are also horizontal lines of paired stitches running through each of the other-side pictures shown above. Those stitches were formed by the combination stitch that I used to attach the long strips of black linen to the flannel sheet, as described here

Four strips of black linen attached directly to the flannel backing log-cabin style

For the record, this is how I worked the Combination Stitch of one tiny backstitch combined with two running stitches …

where the needle comes up at 1, a tiny back stitch down at 2, followed by running stitches up at 3, down at 4, and up at 5 … all done in one motion.

The next pass of stitches continues up at 5, down at 6, up at 7, down at 8, and up at 9.

The result on the top side is a series of stitches that look like dash dot dash dot … on the back the stitches look like paired dashes.

The reason you do not actually see the stitches on top in the image above is that the strips of cloth were folded over on themselves after being attached to the flannel in order to create a bound edge … basically a form of log-cabin construction directly on the flannel backing cloth.

I used some other ways of attaching cloth to the flannel sheet, so stay tuned for more in the promised series …