– Turning redux

Retrospective (10/6)

Patch #263 Almost Equinox

Original Post 
I just had to show this in response to Jude Hill’s post entitled Turning (http://spiritcloth.typepad.com/spirit_cloth/2016/09/turning.html) …

It’s an antique clock reel for winding skeins (which I mistakenly called a click reel for years because of the loud sound it makes every 40 revolutions) gifted by my parents back when I was the Needleworker at Colonial Williamsburg …
Later …
Three more patches …

I’m slowly catching up with this month.  The patch for September 8th (http://imgoingtotexas.blogspot.com/2016/09/never-say.html) started here with a print of the Hot Springs fountain and some indigo shibori that I made last year …

the mirror imaging was too good to pass up, so I went with it …

I originally planned to do a Celtic knot-like take on the GPS clover leaf in the September 9th post (http://imgoingtotexas.blogspot.com/2016/09/drinking-kool-aid.html), but as I looked back at the Google search image collage of Magnolia Market near the end, my eye caught on the interior shot of the metal roof and light strings. It sure did remind me of the thrifted multi-color jacket I just got.
Sure enough, there were some patches of color that looked very similar to the metal roof panels. A few Jude Hill thread beads later, the lights came on …

Interesting side note: my needle literally squeaked through the cloth, which I had hoped was linen since the fabric content label was cut out (my Cursillista readers in Tidewater Virginia will get a kick out of the maker’s label that remained) …

Looking more closely at the frayed edges of the patch, I realized I was working with wool. But hey, it made it through the wash, so onward!
The last patch for today came from cloth that I had been invited to bring to Deb McClintock’s native natural dye workshop on September 10th (http://imgoingtotexas.blogspot.com/2016/09/dye-stuff.html). It was originally a vintage linen tablecloth …

that I dyed last year with Prairie Tea (Croton) gathered in the yard. Better yet, it bore a striking resemblance to the Texas Persimmon dyed linen blouse that Deb was wearing …

Gotta love what the land gives us!

– Cloudy with a chance of no rain

Addendum

Patch #205 Summer sky

Somehow I managed to forget to include this patch yesterday. In any case, it was cut from this indigo-dyed shibori cloth made last November during Maura Ambrose’s dye workshop …

Original Post

“Clouds,” I thought to myself yesterday, “that’s what I’ll write about tomorrow.”

As with last summer, depicted here in the cloth Land of Flood and Drought …


there has been no rain this July either …

And while there was still enough residual moisture in the ground last week to raise some morning mists, this past week has been bone dry.
Amazingly, though, there are often clouds in the afternoon, hence these streaky white patches …
Sometimes there are even enough clouds to raise the (false) hope of rain. But rather than massing and turning somber gray, the clouds of Texas summer stay white and puffy, if they stay at all …

Meantime, the floodplain belies its name, turning the dormant brown of an east coast field in midwinter … 

And irony abounds as Snow-on-the-Mountain and Frostweed are the only wildflowers that are coming into bloom. 

– Violet and the Blood Moon

Morna Crites-Moore had a beautiful post today. If you haven’t seen it yet, click here to take a look … I’ll wait.
Her post, along with the news of David Bowie’s death from liver cancer inspired today’s violet patch  (not that I was a fan, but Ziggy Stardust, Major Tom, and Suffragette City did play in the background of my teenage years) …
Patch #11 Discharge bleach dyeing on linen

I haven’t done any discharge dyeing with bleach for over a year, mostly because I wasn’t wild about cutting freezer paper masks. Having long intended to try using Don’s foam paint daubers as an alternative, Morna’s post gave me the incentive finally to give it a try ..
Note: Jude Hill did not recommend Lemon Soft Scrub, but it was all they had at HEB

So even though it looked promising …
Looks can be deceiving …

nothing much happened. Reading the label I found bleach waaaay down the list of ingredients. Hmmm.
Not to be deterred, I dug out a bleach pen, squeezed some out on the plastic lid and gave it a try. Whoa … talk about fast acting!  The first couple of moons went way too far. Then I tried rinsing sooner, and others didn’t go far enough …
In addition to the moon variations,
I was seriously debating which was the best violet representative

Fortunately, the moon at the beginning of the post was just right. Because it only takes one, right? Which reminds me … gotta buy one of those billion dollar lottery tickets today.
Before I head out though, here’s the final batch of pictures from the natural dyeing workshop …
A blurry picture of Maura hanging the first demo

Ten of the sixteen participants
Three vats of red

into which we all dipped cloth we brought with us for the workshop

Brazilwood (which Mo informed me is an endangered species)
samples of which were cut up and given to each participant

Silk, cotton, linen and wool dipped in
Cochineal and Madder were also shared with everyone

 The second day of the workshop was dedicated to Indigo magic
1 …

2 …

3!!!
Once again, we were all given the opportunity to dye our own cloth
which everyone was prepared to do
The afternoon was dedicated to creating shibori
graced with a rare touch of sunshine over the blackland prairie