New moons

Up until now, the Moon Myth bases have been made before the moon patches. Now, as the moon wanes, I have turned the process around …

The waning gibbous is thrifted white damask (50 cents) and Deb Lacativa  dyed cloth (priceless) reverse appliquéd with thrifted charcoal gray linen ($2).
The last quarter moon on the right is worked on indigo shibori cotton dyed at Maura Ambrose’s workshop several years ago, sandwiched around a thrifted white damask hem ($1).
There were a few also-ran moons which may or may not make the final cut …

And good news: we have been in a long spell of no rain, but ever since Fiona’s peace weather-gram and Barry’s piece of peace (more on that later) were hung on our porch thermometer …

it has been raining …

Sadly, but true to the land of flood and drought, the almost-bone-dry Blanco River, home of these rock cairns down the road from us  …

has now risen and washed them all away …

If you have Facebook, you may be able to see (and hear) video of the Blanco River.

Moon rise

Page 9 of Moon Myth is another memory cloth of a golden full moon rising over the trees on Cascade Trail …

Once again, Deb Lacativa’s dyed cloth and threads have a starring role …

And this time I did a turned-edge reverse appliqué lined with a row of split back stitch worked with two strands of floss, while a single strand of detached back stitch danced around the edges of the dyed cloth marks.

That’s better

I’m happier with this version of the waxing quarter moon (aka half moon) for page 7 of Moon Myth

Both halves of the black sky are Deb Lacativa dyed damasks, and I love that one trends red while the other trends green …

The starry field is not-so-invisible basting worked in silk. The moon is cut from the selvage edge of a handwoven placemat.

Of course, this isn’t exactly what I had planned. I had auditioned these pieces of cloth …

and pieced them together …

then invisibly basted them down with the expectation that I would reverse appliqué to reveal both white and a mottled “dark half” of the moon …

But then I had second thoughts, confirmed by my in-house consultant, that it might be best to reverse appliqué only the half over the moon. So I unstitched, cut and reworked …

with the result shown at the beginning of this post. 
Phew. I’ve almost reached the half-way point with seven out of sixteen pages complete. Now I have more bases to make and more pages to compose. 
I think I can, I think I can …