Wouldn’t you think?

Addendum: Link to peace pin arrival here …

It seems like I’ve made enough of the peace pins that I should be able to stitch them free-hand. Or at least with minimal hand-lettering.

So as I worked on a pin for Hazel, I decided to use a white marking pen to give just a hint of line on madder dyed linen …

with blue and green to go along with her recent posts …
Except, as is often the case, what’s in my mind doesn’t always translate smoothly onto cloth …

Fortunately, I have one of Hazel’s boats close at hand for encouragement so the third time was the charm …

backed with a bit of indigo shibori ...

and now ready to sail away.

– Cue

Patch #229 BBQ

We’ve had rain in abundance this week …

which has brought cooler temperatures. So our Tuesday afternoon errands in San Marcos provided an opportunity to indulge in slightly heavier fare: cue … as in barbecue, bar-b-que, BBQ, or simply Q. Which means beef brisket if you live in Texas and something else entirely if you don’t.

Growing up on Long Island, a backyard barbecue meant burgers and hot dogs. In Virginia, Pierce’s Pitt Bar-B-Que was the non plus ultra, where the meat was pork and the sauce had a tomato base. 

Nothing could beat it for succulence.
So I didn’t really “get” Texas brisket at first. It seemed kinda dry and not all that flavorful. Until the fateful day when I stood behind someone in a cut-to-order line and overheard, “Fatty end with bark, please.” Ah, that’s the secret!
Because really, lean makes no sense. If you’re going to eat cue, you need to go all the way. And I’ve since learned that properly smoked brisket, with its blackened exterior and red halo line, needs no sauce if the meat is already dripping in its own juices. All you need is some white bread to soak up the excess drippings and some vegetal sides so you can convince yourself you’re eating something healthy.
Something like this …
served on sheets of salmon pink butcher paper. Pure bliss.
Oh, about that “Q” on the patch. I found a box of rubber stamps at the local thrift store, so even though I’m far more comfortable with hand lettering these days, the “Q” gave me the perfect excuse to try out my new toys …
done in satin stitch for a change …

N.B. I just slipped in a retrospective post for last Sunday: http://imgoingtotexas.blogspot.com/2016/08/up.html

– Picturing process

Patch #143 I love you



I was absent on Mother’s Day this year, off strolling about New Orleans. So my card, made by Meg and Griffin, was not received until Tuesday …

Written across the bottom in orange crayon were the letters “NANA” … and all I could think was how much love and effort went into forming each one.
Having recently revisited a technique I used (and then forgot) on Triangulation (see Index in side bar), I decided to document the process this time lest I forget again.
First I chose the fabrics I wanted to use for my patches and ironed them into 1 3/4″ strips (using cover stock cut to size) …

Next I photocopied the text and cut out the letters. Using a large needle to poke holes in the text, I transferred the marks to linen by going over each hole with water-erasable marker  …

I cut the patch to size and finger-pressed the ends …

inserted a bit of harem cloth inside the patch …

and used Jude Hill’s invisible basting stitch (aka glue stitch) to secure the edges …

The actual stitching, with two strands of floss worked in Jude’s split back stitch, gave me the chance to experience the path that G took in forming each letter …

In the end, I made three patches in our favorite colors …

orange for G, blue for Don (aka Pop Pop) and green for me. 
N.B. The individual patches can be viewed in the Retrospective posts for 
May 10-12.