Getting back to "The Land … "

Working on the pennant for Mo’s project put The Land as the Crow Flies on a back burner, as you can see from the date …

Now that I’m back to it, trees are beginning to crop up …

And the cloth has been trimmed down …

to fit within the space where it will eventually reside …

The plan, for now at least, is to leave it hanging except when I am actively working on it. We’ll see how that goes.
I also popped off a couple of simple projects to get back up to speed. Jeans mended with vintage cloth from Glennis Dolce …

along with a little darning on the side …

And a patched shell woven with Deb Lacativa’s dyed floss …

requested by G for his birthday …

bringing back memories of Jude Hill’s Considering Weave class in 2014 when I first met many of the Kindred Spirits who reside in the right sidebar. 

Homesteading

This is The Land as the Crow Flies as it stands right now (about 40″ wide by 19″ high) …

Over the past few weeks it has morphed considerably from green grids of cloth weaving laid out linearly …

to various trials at angles …

along with a fair bit of design mending as I realized I wasn’t happy with some of my fabric choices.
There was also consideration of how and where to eventually place the house …

and how to represent the stone wall boundary lines (torn strips of linen rolled between the fingers and couched down with two strands of floss), as well as the topographic elevation contours (detached backstitch worked with two strands of variegated floss) …

So far, so good.

Stitching the floodplain

The first part of The Land as the Crow Flies (20″ high x 15″ wide) has been basted down using Jude Hill’s glue stitch …

I played around by imposing an angled frame with a 4 1/2″ square opening and a 5 1/2″ exterior over each cloth-woven square …

basted down the raw edges up to the inner frame dimensions …

which is easier to see from the back …

then cut away the excess …

and started overlapping the pieces so they were effectively 5″ to a side …

After which I played around with different arrangements until I settled on one that represented some of the major features on the floodplain (dry creek bed channels, scoured bedrock, poverty weed patches, etc.) …

Next up will be the greener, tree-covered part of the property, as depicted in these composite shots …

Here’s hoping I’ll be as happily surprised by the results as Parker is here …

(Seriously, I’ll use any excuse to include grandkid pictures in my posts)