That’s better

I’m happier with this version of the waxing quarter moon (aka half moon) for page 7 of Moon Myth

Both halves of the black sky are Deb Lacativa dyed damasks, and I love that one trends red while the other trends green …

The starry field is not-so-invisible basting worked in silk. The moon is cut from the selvage edge of a handwoven placemat.

Of course, this isn’t exactly what I had planned. I had auditioned these pieces of cloth …

and pieced them together …

then invisibly basted them down with the expectation that I would reverse appliqué to reveal both white and a mottled “dark half” of the moon …

But then I had second thoughts, confirmed by my in-house consultant, that it might be best to reverse appliqué only the half over the moon. So I unstitched, cut and reworked …

with the result shown at the beginning of this post. 
Phew. I’ve almost reached the half-way point with seven out of sixteen pages complete. Now I have more bases to make and more pages to compose. 
I think I can, I think I can …

One step forward and one step back …

Note: You can view the Moon Myth pages sequentially by going to the sidebar page FOLLOW THE PROGRESS OF MOON MYTH and clicking the link entitled Draft of the most current images.

Page 6 of Moon Myth …



with some cloudy blue skies and pure white damask, both courtesy of Deb Lacativa who responded awesomely to my request for SunMoonStars cloth …

and likewise Deb’s “dirty threads” seen here encircling the reverse appliqué edge. 
As we drove to Austin yesterday, I spotted the same kind of cloud edging that I was going for …

albeit a bit more artfully done by Mother Nature.
Unfortunately, I’m less than thrilled with progress on Page 7 …

So my solution is to cover it up with text rather than try to to rip it all out (and fortunately, I have more of Deb’s beautiful dark blue cloth to work with) …

Finally, I haven’t forgotten Hazel’s query about how I worked my crossed stitch edging a while back. So, for those who might be interested, here’s a step by step.
After pre-cutting a white damask crescent and lining it up behind the cloudy blue cloth which had an erasable marker circle drawn on it, I invisibly basted both to the light blue cloth. Then I cut along the edge of the marked circle, creating a reverse appliqué …

Of course, I forgot to take process shots of the first step, so what you see is the step where I am wrap stitching the edge of the crescent moon in leftover wedding handkerchief silk …

After securing the moon’s edge, I took a single strand of Deb Lacativa floss and began to stitch counterclockwise around the edge of the cut circle, using the invisible baste stitches as a guide …

Note: in the earlier version, the invisible baste stitches were larger detached back stitches, and I intentionally varied the distance of the stitches from the edge of the circle  …

 After completing the first pass …

I reversed direction … 

going clockwise …

to complete the edge …

As I commented to Hazel, I enjoyed this far more than blanket stitching, but for sure the raw edge will be far more prone to fray. That’s okay by me for this application, but might not be appropriate for others. Certainly, a turned appliqué edge on the outer circle could precede the crossed stitch edge for more stability.

Coloring outside the lines

I was going to post each page of Moon Myth as it was completed, but I can’t wait that long.

So here’s page one in progress, which began with auditioning some Deb Lacativa cloth …

I learned, as always. What began as a 3.5″ square of blue damask shredded down to a smaller-than-intended size …

I decided it still had potential and kept on going by wrapping the edge of the reverse appliqué orb to keep it from shredding any further …

Then started to semi-freestyle rays of sunshine …

which is why I use water-erasable marker, because I don’t always follow the lines …

One final note: you may notice two marker colors. The turquoise is a very heavy-duty marker that can take multiple waterings before it disappears. The purple marker is a new-to-me product that vanishes into thin air, supposedly within 24-48 hours. Unfortunately, it sometimes disappears far sooner than that, leaving me wondering where the line went …