Stitching the floodplain

The first part of The Land as the Crow Flies (20″ high x 15″ wide) has been basted down using Jude Hill’s glue stitch …

I played around by imposing an angled frame with a 4 1/2″ square opening and a 5 1/2″ exterior over each cloth-woven square …

basted down the raw edges up to the inner frame dimensions …

which is easier to see from the back …

then cut away the excess …

and started overlapping the pieces so they were effectively 5″ to a side …

After which I played around with different arrangements until I settled on one that represented some of the major features on the floodplain (dry creek bed channels, scoured bedrock, poverty weed patches, etc.) …

Next up will be the greener, tree-covered part of the property, as depicted in these composite shots …

Here’s hoping I’ll be as happily surprised by the results as Parker is here …

(Seriously, I’ll use any excuse to include grandkid pictures in my posts)

16 thoughts on “Stitching the floodplain

  1. hehehe….I tend to add GD pix whenever possible too.I really like this floodplain so far, and the jumble of 'tree' scraps works too. Smart, skewing the blocks AFTER weaving them. I would have skewed as I wove, so the land would have been cockeyed.

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  2. So interesting to see how you are constructing this view. Love the colors. Thanks for showing your process and thoughts.

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  3. This is amazing! I love seeing the inspirational photos. Thank you so much for sharing the process. This is great fun.Missed you.Hunter

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  4. Beautiful echoes of your land, in color, in design, in texture; there is such a deep sense of knowing that comes from your reverence Liz in treasuring your landscape of home. I've been thinking about how it is for those of us who use cloth to speak of landscape and today, as sometimes happens, a gift of finding this quote from the Irish philosopher, ex-priest and poet, John O' Donohue who said:\”When you bring your body out into the landscape, you bring your body home where it belongs. When you step outside, it matters if you see landscape as a location or if you see it as walking into a living place.\”

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  5. Thanks to all for the encouragement … And I commend the quote in Marti's comment to your attention: \”Walking into a living place\” … then honoring it in cloth.

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  6. I've seen many 'map quilts' over the years — many of them impressive — and this one is right up there with them. maybe more suggestive than some of the literal ones, and I like that. What a great method.

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  7. Beth – Glad you like it … I love to \”think out of the box\”Dee – Thanks for liking the wonkiness … I'm trying to see like a crow

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  8. Liz, this is a wonderful piece. Your method of finding wonky angles within the straight woven grids is inspired. Thank you for sharing it here.wow and wow.xo

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  9. Judy – Thank you … I have to credit Jude Hill's collage patching for the idea of turning grids on end. It delights me that the way I got there is resonating with others.

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  10. you know that i come here a lot to avail self of your side bar that haseveryone on itand this one i have sat with over and over, long moments, andcome to be so peaceFULL in this Sitting With…and i see it as part of a very large Cloth….over years. maybe alifeTime

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